About your Search

20140226
20140306
SHOW
News 19
RT News 10
Cavuto 8
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 61
ALJAZAM 41
KCSM (PBS) 41
SFGTV 41
CSPAN 35
CNNW 32
CSPAN2 32
FBC 24
KTVU (FOX) 21
KPIX (CBS) 19
KQED (PBS) 19
COM 17
KGO (ABC) 16
CNBC 14
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 529
French 3
Korean 1
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 535 (some duplicates have been removed)
of america's youngest urban farmers. schoolchildren learning science while helping those in need. news hour's tracy wolf reports. >> this may look like another commercial greenhouse, but it's actually a working science lab for students in kindergarten up through the eighth grade. it's one of 12 that's been built as part of an initiative to put 100 greenhouse labs in new york city schools by 2020. greenhouses in secondary schools isn't new. using hydroponic growing systems is. a method of farming using water and nutrients instead of soil hydroponic farming allows students to learn urban sustainability. >> one of our programs stresses is the science education and the science behind the growing. >> cecil is the director of development for new york sunworks, a nonprofit that is dedicated to building science labs in urban schools. >> it's really not about urban farming for us. it's about talking about science. that's because most people care about food. urban farming is a great way to do it. >> new york sunworks opened this 1,400 square foot greenhouse lab on the roof of the school gymnasium in
. this is a show about science by scientists. let's check out our team of hard core nerds. i'm phil torres, i'm an entomologist. tonight the frozen zoo. in a deep freeze, sells from the endangered species ton planet. like the white rhino. dr. shini somara is a mechanical engineer. tonight she's inside a tornado. find out what scientists are doing to help us survive these killer storms. marita davidson is a biologist, specializing in ecology and evolution. that's our team. now let's do some science. ♪ ♪ ♪ hey guys, welcome to "techknow." i'm phil torres. joining us are shini somara and marita davidson. >>> one of my big issues i'm working on is how to conserve our wildlife. i got to go down to the san diego zoo. this zoo is frozen! so let's take a look. at the famous san diego zoo safari park, lies a zoo within a zoo, replaced by liquid nitrogen and cell cultures. this is san diego's frozen zoo. that's right, zoo. not the one you grew up visiting but one in which there are living specious preserved and frozen, all to help protect future generations of animals currently facing extinction
the intersection of hardware and humanity, and we're doing it in a unique way. this is a show about science by scientists. let's check out our team of hard core nerds. i'm phil torres, i'm an entomologist. tonight the frozen zoo. in a deep freeze, cells from the most endangered specious on the planet, like the white rhino. brick e-bringing back ex tint types. dr. shini somara is a mechanical engineer. tonight she's inside a tornado. find out what scientists are doing to help us survive these killer storms. marita davidson is a biologist, specializing in ecology and evolution. that's our team. now let's do some science. ♪ ♪ ♪. >> hey guys, welcome to "techknow." i'm phil torres. joining us today are dr. shini somara and marita davidson. guys when i'm in the field doing my research, one of my big issues i'm working on is how to conserve our wildlife. i got to go down to the san diego zoo. sme they are prerving dozens of -- they are preserving dozens of different species. this zoo is frozen! so let's take a look. at the famous san diego zoo safari park, lies a zoo within a zoo, replaced
intelligence is. with neuroscience, intel lot more on top of programming and computer science. with him in cognition in the science of a.i. asks what does human to? what are you? what is intelligence? >> with research business sidelight concise that says it is the ability to achieve goals elaborate on dash there's a lot packed into that definition. if it is not doing something that it should be mobile and should come with a body because if you cannot move around and adapt it could be poor quality. it comes with the ability is the lever have. they can learn some other animals can learn. i have been interested hover -- in a.i. over several decades by really got it to arrive was working for the learning channel. and i got to interview a pioneer of speech recognition technology that machines that read books to the blind and others has cleaned the terms security that he has reprinted the term that has been around quite a while. now works for google in charge in those research iceboat do they think that is the fastest way to create human level intelligence on a machine. that might be somethin
for retirement and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we're going to get to that in a minute, but first, a federal appeals court has upheld a california high school's decision to ban t-shirts with the u.s. flag on them. in 2010, officials at live oak high school in san jose ordered students wearing such students in tw2010 to either hide the fl or go home, fearing they would insig insight violence with latino students. they ruled they did not violate students' constitutional rights by doing so. this is a very interesting case, but many legal experts think the supreme court will not take this up, this is settled case law. this decision will stand. andrea, what do you make of it? >> i think the nation has lost its marbles. they have gone crazy. there's no way these students do not have a constitutional right to wear an american flag on their shirt. take the law out of it. last time i checked, cinco de mayo was a holiday, not in the united states of america. if you want to celebrate cinco de mayo, great.
generation of science standards and looking at that middle grade sequence of science standards how do we best prepare our students for science and biology, chemistry or physics. we'll be coming to you and speaking to you about that in the future. but drawing the direct connections, making the hand shakes between math and science is something that under as a stem team we are undertaking currently. >> commissioner maufas? >> thank you, president fewer. i wasn't going to comment because i only have one kid and she was really good at math and so good that she was able to explain to others. i got lucky. that is not my case. i don't know how i got that kid. but my question is, that is just because everybody else explained about their kids. my question is how -- teachers thank you so much for coming out and sharing these stories. but it's really what i hear out in the community what commissioner is commenting on and what she's hearing which is not going way anytime soon that my children is not going to get this. i know they are going to bring this now some shape or form. i'm sort of wondering how we
're doing it in a unique way. a show about science by scientists . lindsay moran, science versus the deaf takings of ptsd. soldiers december pri battle. kosta grammatis is behind the wheel of the future testing out a driverless car . rachelle oldmixon is an environmental scientists. i'm phil torres, an entomologist. now let's do some science. ♪ >> hey guys welcome to techknow where we bring you life changing innovations in the field of science. i'm phil torres and i'm here with kosta , rachelle and lindsay. >> when we think of camp lejeune, we deal with soldiers to go into the field. but there's an epidemic with soldiers returning with completely invisible wounds, i'm talking about ptsd. be camp lejeune has innovative ways of technology to combat this problem. the ugliness of war has made an indelible mark on the minds of many americans. and can linger longer after deployment has ended. posttraumatic stress disorder or ptsd was first diagnosed in 1980 but has existed for as long as there has been war. >> clearly it appears the underlying cause of those conditions were the same as the un
, is science. which calls for patience, reason, and a desire to be proven wrong. none exists among hysterics. you need to find those who resist panic and want to do what is right. avoid these straights. exaggeration. panics are just that. panic hysteric. and mask worse, far deadlier problems. mockery over detail. more people die from vitamin deficiency than climate change, and cold weather is far deadlier than warm. calling someone a flat earther is easier than doing homework. third, a fear of criticism. we learned there are 717 new planets. amazing but unsurprising. the universe is unknowable, so that's why we learn new things about it. imagine if they were like kerry or obama and said the science is settled about the nine plants we learned about as a kid. what would they do when faced with the new worlds, exactly what you're seeing now, panic. the classic nine planets became eight when jupiter was downgraded to a dwarf planet. i sympathize. moore dedicated his life to saving the planet, he co-founded green peace. i'm sure you have something on him to disgrace him. >> i thought it was pluto
that are kind of the thin edge of the wedge here? >> i think like the rest of the planet, i accept the science of climate change. i don't think that you can look at any one weather event and say that's climate change. but you can look at the way the patterns, overall, the world is getting warmer and the weather, as a result, more extreme droughts, more extreme flooding, more extremity hurricanes and cyclones. we suffer from these extreme weather events. certainly we've seen extreme heat and flooding, cyclones. so for all of us, whether it's living in australia or any other part of the world, we've got an obligation to make sure we're doing less damage in the world in which we live and constraining the amount of carbon we generate. under the governmental i led we introduced an emissions trading scheme with a fixed price for the first three years. it was a very controversial policy, and continues to be a very controversial policy. >> you're watching "talk to al jazeera." we'll have more in a minute. shinmarita this is "talk to al jazeera." i'm ray suarez. i'm joined by julia gillard. who is the
1944 that the atomic program telling him his minister of armaments atomic science is jewish science. said don't concentrate on that. i am paraphrasing. >> in what they learned was that the third reich was experimenting and humans. said he was pulled from concentration camps. this is the first time to american military intelligence. >> and he came across in a letter director of the third reich is very difficult to imagine that later he became part of "operation paperclip" but certainly at the time to find out this information to right in his memoirs he could not believe that. also the documents that he came across is the surgeon general of the third reich that later became part of a paper clip and wind up living in texas. so while heading of the biological weapon division, as the right was trying to create the bubonic plague. but at the same time but worth day to unleash the forces subjects to this agent is difficult without a vaccine. and to do that working with the concentration camp. so i just want you to remember him. he comes up later and of course, it goring ahead of all scienc
the intersection of hardware and humanity and doing it in a unique way. this is a show about science by scientists. let's check out our team of hardcore nerds. lindsey miran is a cia operative and analyst. tonight, high tech crime stoppers. shots fired in the night. cops pinpoint the crime scene. how do they do it? the new science of solving crime. crystal dilworth is a scientist. if you think wine making is old school, think good. the newest ways of making wine. >> a neuro scientist and i will phil tores, an entimologist. the by onic arm. see how it's more man-like than machine. that's our team. now, let's do some science. >> hey, guys, welcome to techknow where we bring you stories of innovation here in america. i am phil torres. i am here with michelle, crystal and lindsey. you went to one of the most violent cities in america to see how technology can help us fight crime? >> that's right. i went to oakland, california which has the 5th highest crime rate and nearby richmond which is among the top 20 to look at some very innovative technology that they are looking to increase the eyes and ears
science reporter miles o'brien dives right back into work after returning to the country a few days ago without his left arm. >> everybody is talking about polar vortexes. >> reporter: the former cnn anchor specializing in science, technology and aerospace is moderating a panel on climate change in northwest, a commitment he made well before his accident. >> sometimes the best tonic is to stay focused on work. >> reporter: i wish i had a better story to tell you about why i am typing this with one hand he inside his blog. a shark attack it would be interesting. an assassination attempt would be intriguing. skydiving mishappens always make for good copy. no. o'brien was on a shoot in japan in the philippines reporting on the aftermath in the fukushima disaster. it was a seemingly minor accident. he was packing up tv equipment when a caseful of camera gear fell on his forearm. two days later he's in the hospital suffering from acute compartment syndrome, a condition where blood flow is cut off to the muscle. the doctor made the life and death decision to amputate his arm above the elbo
, as hitler told his minister of armaments, atomic science is jewish science so let's not concentrate on that. i'm paraphrasing but you get the idea. hitler was interested in biological weapons and what goosman learned was reich was experimenting with these weapons on humans that had been culled from concentration camps, and this was the first time that this information became available to american military intelligence. the director, samuel goodsman, came across this man in a letter, and this is dr. kurt blama. the deputy director of the third reich. it's hard to imagine he became part of prognosis paperclip, and the at the time goodsman found out the information he would not have believed that and he later wrote in this memoirs we do not believe that. also in the documents that goodsman came across what decider walter some ryaner, surgeon general of the third reich, became part of paperclip and would wind up living in texas. dr. schieber was in charge of the vaccine program for the reich so while blome was heading up the biological weapons division, the reich was trying to create a bubonic
of settled science. joining us from washington the guy causing all the trouble as he always does, charles krauthammer. author of the big best seller "things that matter." first of all, what is this column about? >> well, i was just objecting to president obama saying in his state of the union address that global warming is settled science. there is no such thing as settled science. particularly as something as unsettled and as reliant on models which are very changeable as is climate studies. and, you know, obama went out earlier that week to california to the drought and said this is is a result of global warming and he pledged a billion dollars to mitigate the effect of global warming when, in fact, even the global warming models as the "new york times" pointed out not exactly a right wing rag, even the global warming models say that as a result, you would have expected increased in rain, not a decrease in california. the same with hurricane sandy, the same with tornadoes, every time you hear about one, you get the mayor of new york and others demagoguing this, blaming it on climate cha
of running for president. >> it's like your 13-year-old son's science experiment. >> sign it or veto it. >> every second she doesn't veto is is a black mark on the state of arizona. >> as governor, i don't have a magic wand. some daisy hit the lights right, some days i don't. >> some days, you hit them right and some days you don't. words of wisdom, a ver tabl zen as he hit his landmark 111th town hall. this was th time he was in sterling, new jersey, about 40 minutes from the george washington bridge depending on traffic. sorry, we had to. the soundtrack with bruce, the mood was boisterous and the message, hey, trust me. >> my job is to be the adult in the room. to tell you folks the truth about what's going on. the fact is that i've got an obligation to tell you all the truth. >> everyone? >> no matter what. >> hey everyone? christie is the grown-up in the room. doesn't know about traffic problems in ft. lee or former aides and social studies class. you know what else, chris christie is not giving a single thought to politics these days. not a one. >> i'm in my second term now. accord
science saturdays and science saturdays will be a mix of volunteer opportunities to work in the park. and hands on, environmental education programs, that might be of interest to kids and families, lecture based that might be more for adults or working academics and the center will also be made available to city departments and community groups to use as meeting and assembly space. >> the bay institute aquarium foundation and the partners plans for these and other activities are documented in the operations and program plan. the bay institute aquarium foundation will report quarterly to the port, on its implementation of the plan. either the port, or the tenant may suggest revisions to the plan, in any case, the revisions will be subject to the approval by the port's executive director or her desingee, and upon the commission's request we will hope to come back in a not too distant future and update you on our progress towards implementing the plan. and that concludes my presentation. >> so moved. >> second. >> thank you. >> any public comment? >> seeing none, commissioners? >> i not
that america will go to war over this. they hope the u.s. will do something. voices, science, and flags held high, -- science -- signs, and fisa high, they gathered in protest. itself.ry repeats but they are adrienne concerned about what the obama consideration -- they are angry and concerned about what the obama administration considers an invasion. for three days, russian tanks and troops have been crossing into you rate. costsre will be cross -- involved of an invasion of ukraine. a 90 minute phone conversation with barack obama and vladimir putin has changed nothing. army is heavily armed. they have surrounded a crimean garrison. the military operation stops, there will be thousands upon thousands. >> these protesters know the hard truth. knows thatt obama the americans do not want this. assembled heree include some who lived in the u.s. for decades. they say that the nation can and should act. >> there is financial activity. it is the beginning. at this hour, president obama is working the phones and communicating with european leaders. 6000 russian troops are on the ground and in the a
science. however, we were able to provide $131 million increase for the national institute on ageing in the recent fiscal year 2014 omnibus. again, with the expectation that promising science in alzheimer's disease will be supported. we have a distinguished panel of experts here today, scientists, economists, patients, family members. we also have quite an audience. let me welcome representatives of the alzheimer's association. some of you came a long way to be here today. we thank you for your tireless work to educate members of congress and the press about the need to do more to help you and your loved ones. also in the audience are students, i am told, from the university of virginia. these young people are spending a day here learning about budget and appropriations, and we welcome all of you here also. on our first panel, of course, we'll hear from dr. francis collins, the distinguished director of the national institutes of health, who will discuss the current state of science and what kinds of research are most likely to benefit from our appropriations. i would note we are als
-review process to support the most promising science. however, we were able to provide $131 million increase for the national institute on ageing in the recent fiscal year 2014 omnibus. again, with the expectation that promising science in alzheimer's disease will be supported. we have a distinguished panel of experts here today, scientists, economists, patients, family members. we also have quite an audience. let me welcome representatives of the alzheimer's association. some of you came a long way to be here today. we thank you for your tireless work to educate members of congress and the press about the need to do more to help you and your loved ones. also in the audience are students, i am told, from the university of virginia. these young people are spending a day here learning about budget and appropriations, and we welcome all of you here also. on our first panel, of course, we'll hear from dr. francis collins, the distinguished director of the national institutes of health, who will discuss the current state of science and what kinds of research are most likely to benefit from our ap
are wearing. we have got bill nye the science guy. [applause] tyson from these hayden planetarium. [applause] you a sneakn give peak of his new show, "cosmos." [applause] i saw the original version. it was spectacular and wonderful and i know this is going to be not just as good but even better . we are thrilled with that. we are opening on a big show here because we are honoring some remarkable filmmakers. i have said before, i believe and i hope all of us believe that every child in america deserves a world-class education. especially in science, technology, engineering and math. it is skills like these that make us an economic superpower and build our middle class. we also need folks who are studying the arts. our film industry is a huge generator of jobs and economic power here in the united states. it tells us our story and helps us to find what is our common humanity. allow nasa toese announce the other day that we have discovered more than 700 new planets. [applause] that is cool. we didn't make the planets but we found out that they were there. [laughter] we deliverways that the best
in science and math? a peninsula woman has developed a program that is being duplicated nationwide. sharon chin has been profiling jefferson award winners since 2008 and has tonight's recipient. >> reporter: marie wolbach had to talk her way into a high school physics class for boys and got turned down for a training as a physician's assistants because she is a woman. those experiences inspired her to make a difference. girls explore the outdoors. >> all part of the food chain. >> reporter: program robots they build. and analyze fat in french fries. it's a tiny taste of tech trek over the years a week-long summer camp for underservedth grade girls founded by marie wolbach of palo alto. >> i don't know what you did this week but i left a girl and i just picked up a young woman. >> i work at pixar. >> i'm doing my math at public health. >> reporter: since it started about 11,000 girls have learned about science and math careers while living on a college campus. marie founded the educational program as part of the american association of university women. stanford junior lauren decided to st
. and with some planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. millions have raised their hand for the proven relief of the purple pill. and that relief could be in your hand. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn symptoms from acid reflux disease. find out how you can save at purplepill.com. there is risk of bone fracture and low magnesium levels. side effects may include headache, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. if you have persistent diarrhea, contact your doctor right away. other serious stomach conditions may exist. avoid if you take clopidogrel. for many, relief is at hand. ask your doctor about nexium. what's precious to you is precious to us. and from your family, to your belongings, to your dreams for retirement, nationwide is here to protect what you love most. we put members first, because we don't have shareholders. join the nation. ♪ nationwide is on your side >>> can you take it? i can't get everybody in here. >> my arms are asleep. >> that's good, look at us. >
science has thanked god piled up indicating there's a big impact and release of a lot of carcinogenic material into the environment, which may well be linked up with the health issues that have arisen downstream, especially in the community of ft. chipewan, about an hour's flight north downstream. >> and doctor, how much oil could be leaked out of a pipeline lfr it would become very serious in your opinion? >> i would have to hazard a guess at that and i would like to leave that up to the experts. >> okay. senator, do you expect the state department to give this a stamp of approval? john kerry gave a very pointed speech a couple of weekends ago about this, almost to the point writ's going to be hard for him to back away and give the president a recommendation for approval. and do you think that this state department report is credible? >> i think that there are flaws within the state department report, but i also want to say that if you actually look at the state department report it's a lot more balanced than the republican version of the report. the republican version of the report,
it in a unique way. this is a show about science by scientists. let's check out our team of hardcore nerds. lindsey miran is a cia operative and analyst. tonight, high tech crime stoppers. shots fired in the night. cops pinpoint the crime scene. how do they do it? the new science of solving crime. crystal dilworth is a scientist. if you think wine making is old school, think good. the newest ways of making wine. >> a neuro scientist and i will
with the self-confidence they can do anything they set their mind to. with a love of science. >> reporter: stanford graduate ellen lay says it powered her to major in chemical engineering. >> it was so incredible to see role models and feel so much warmth from people believing in me and not making me feel weird for liking this so much. >> reporter: tech trek teacher nancy credits marie's leadership for the camp success. >> she knew what to do. she knew how to get organized and what had to be done. >> reporter: marie says surveys show that tech trek graduates are breaking barriers in engineering and math. >> 54% of them were stem majors. >> reporter: so for opening girls eyes to science and math careers, this week's jefferson award in the bay air goes to marie walba. sharon chin, kpix5. >> and you can nominate your local hero for a jefferson award online on kpix.com/hero. >>> these are going viral. red carpet inspired closet made of pay. >> and if you have a problem, call our hot line. we will be right back. covered california is howet californians can take advantage of the affordable care
. >> you are just doubling. >> yes. you're history.cscalalp, memeet selsun science. seselslsunun e ititchchy y dry. gegetsts t to o ththe e rorootod hydrates the scalp. seselslsunun e ititchchy y dry. >>> we have a segment on this show that our brainiacs love. we call it tech time. kind of encompasses everything tech and science and we depend on zach to help us get smarter. hey, zach. >> hello. >> this is getting a lot of press. >> this is basically a technology to help you read faster, so you are seeing here it starts out at 250 words per minute. they are saying they are stopping your eye from moving around, like, regular reading you have to jump between words, but with their process, your eyes are staring straight at the same spot on your screen the entire time so you can read faster. >> let's go 500 words per minute. >> i like the fast one better. >> i do, too. >> they are letting developers use their technology in different ways so hopefully in the future you can have it wherever so that whatever text you want to read you can do it with this. >> all right, now this next video, wha
professional initiatives that we have in humanities through content literacy and science and both social science and an approach to literacy that includes professional development that we have on saturday through schools through workshops, writers work shops and content literacy. >> thank you very much. it's a great honor to be here. we really appreciate this. we want to frame the why and how in terms of where we are in this implementation process. we always like to ground the work in why this work is taking place and this we really emphasize this as you've heard in mathematics as well this coherent learning and there is a great need for that in language arts and the approach as well as the foundations and philosophical approach in the common core, these went together really well and we were able to move in this direction in a very coherent way. then also additionally convened groups of teachers so we that had opportunity to learn a plan and share within and across sites. so we really have taken advantage of that in this process as well and build the over all center you are that engaged
actually in the country to offer a through g science online with a wet lab. that's been very exciting and english -- what we thought was very important when we formed this office was we wanted to be accountable and the help of julie chan. we really approached this with a top intervention model and find out through d and f list exactly what students need what rather than throwing a huge fishing net out there trying to grab whatever we can and we go at it in a more targeted intervention way and work smarter rather than harder even though we work hard but we also try to work hard as well. sites are located in regions for access to all students through our research we discovered that it's best to divide the city into geographic regions and through those regions we drill down further to the neighborhoods in the schools to see exactly what classes are needed in what area and we provide those classes rather than just a blanket class. at all the schools we look at the needs of the students and provide those classes to the students. once again, online learning which is very exciting with the m
manufacturers said it is critical that any changes are based on current and reliable science. equally important, any changes inform and not confuse consumers. new labels will not be showing up soon. once the f.d.a. makes its final decision, food companies will have two years to update their labels. >> once again we have to point out as lisa said, because you are not going to see it right away. companies will have two years. it's legal for drivers in california to look up directions on the cell phone. a judge reversed the case of a fresno case of a man ticketed for talking on his iphone. talking and texting is illegal in some states. >> 13 workers at a new mexico plant have been exposed to radiation during a leak. jacob ward explains what it means for public safety. >> the wipp is not a landfill, it's a toum. the department of energy opened the facility in 1999, to house the by-product of nuclear weapons. it has hazmat gloves, suits, and is supposed to entomb the materials for 10,000 years. that is until the year 11,999 ad. if, as reports reports suggest, the place has failed, that means it fail
work with usc f now we have bio life companies 50 in mission bay are bio life scientists science. we have some at gladstone and terry at bear and others. you've got 25 hundred usc f faculty and techs. when he said we'll build it and they come if we took an infrastructure approach and built the infrastructure that a new sector low merger and it has. when you see did pharmaceutical companies here with the hospital it will open in 2015 and another hotel pop up and family houseraising money at the stephen's house the other day it will house families to come through the treatment but you'll also see the innovation reflected here. i'm glad to see ray cell here. your not only in the morning an incubator but a inventor to get together with other tech companies and introduce them to the relationship he's pr this is what mission bay is all about no matter where here in hospitality or manufacturing and now in digital health care. i love this blend. i was introduced to this when i was talked about this and she introduced the idea to put all the health data symbol clouds and allow us to astronome
that try marijuana will be addicted to it. as reported in the christian science, hickenlooper is asking for $45 million for youth use prevention and $40 million for substance abuse treatment. cost that could be covered by revenue generated by marijuana sells, they expect to collect $141 million from marijuana sales. >> advertising, how many people can get stoned and still have a great state or a great nation? the world is pretty dangerous and competitive. i think we need to stay alert 24 hours a day. >> classic jerry brown. "new york times" wrote last week showing 51% americans believe marijuana should be legal. live in the news room, back to you. >>> all right, a messy day throughout the bay area today. some showers kept the streets wet. it never cheered up. peaking through from time to time. a chance of showers going to be around for awhile longer. showing that we have gone to widely scattered rain at this hour. >> out on the central valley there were few showers. more in the way of just a little moisture, going all of the way down for the evening commute tomorrow. we will cover what
and humanity and we're doing it in a unique way. a show about science by scientists . lindsay moran, science versus the deaf takings of ptsd. soldiers december pri battle. kosta grammatis is behind the wheel of the future testing out a driverless car
is demonstrating the you type of neuro science lab completed at the campus. he specializes in combining the biofeedback with video games to probe and train the brain. >> what we can do is see someone's brain while they interact with one of our games in realtime. >> here we go. >> outfitted with three-d goggles hart keeps rhythm while blasting asteroids in a virtual world. behind the scenes, computers with processors and turn his brain wave into a classic display. >> vut visual areas in the back. >> it is dubbed -- it is dubbed glass brain and it is the first in creating a system that could some day help diagnose and treat disorders. >> i think we are entering a new stage of medicine where therapeutics are not directed a at molecules like drugs. but software can be used to help healthy brains. >> they can track activity in the brain and adjust the challenges to help strengthen orie pair the neuro pathways. >> i predict where the brain activity is coming from. and to represent it as close as the realtime it is being reported. >> there is hope the music in his brain will help the way scien
to see what goes on at rhythm central. >> he is demonstrating the you type of neuro science lab completed at the campus. he specializes in combining the biofeedback with video games to probe and train the brain. >> what we can do is see someone's brain while they interact with one of our games in realtime. >> here we go. >> outfitted with three-d goggles hart keeps rhythm while blasting asteroids in a virtual world. behind the scenes, computers with processors and turn his brain wave into a classic display. >> vut visual areas in the back. >> it is dubbed -- it is dubbed glass brain and it is the first in creating a system that could some day help diagnose and treat disorders. >> i think we are entering a new stage of medicine where therapeutics are not directed a at molecules like drugs. but software can be used to help healthy brains. >> they can track activity in the brain and adjust the challenges to help strengthen orie pair the neuro pathways. >> i predict where the brain activity is coming from. and to represent it as close as the realtime it is being reported. >> there is hope the
going to be up to science to solve without did it. >> and science is his specialty. so doctor, who committed this crime? >> we really don't know who committed this crime. (laughter) >> which leaves bob and babs alone with their fears. >> there are perverts who love sex with cartoon characters. so that could have been the reason for stealing. the cartoon characters don't really talk back to them while they're having sex. they, they endure it. >> while gumby endures, the message is simple. >> protect your gumby. >> before it's too late. (cheers and applause) >> we' grab a canada dry ginger ale. real ginger. real taste. real ahhh there's a new leader in network speed. t-mobile. have o'hare party repair remove them. and install tostitos cantina chips and salsa. guaranteed to bring that south of the border je ne sais quoi to any occasion! tostitos. bring the party. >> stephen: welcome back, everybody, nation, if you check your calendars will you see that we are a scant 986 days away from the 2016 presidential election. i am feeling pretty good about the gop's chances. while the dems are
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 535 (some duplicates have been removed)